MOCO Vote

Menu

Cut Paw Paw by Andrew Maynard Architects

Cut Paw Paw is a home that is “ridiculously inside-out”.

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_03

Details: In response to a client’s request for a home that was “ridiculously inside-out” Andrew Maynard Architects have designed a house that is deliberately incomplete. A renovation and extension to a double fronted weatherboard home in Victoria, Australia, the design (in keeping with the request) employs sliding walls, bifold doors and decks, and is in fact incomplete. “The central space, between the dining area and the studio, is an unclad frame within and surrounded by garden. It is both inside and outside. It is both a new building and an old ruin. It is both garden and home.” say the architects.

Read more below…

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_02

Source: Photos by Peter Bennetts.

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_07

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_06

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_05

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_10

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_09

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_08

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_12

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_11

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_15

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_14

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_13

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_17

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_16

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_20

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_19

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_18

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_22

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_21

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_25

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_24

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_23

cut_paw_paw_andrew_maynard_architects_26

“What? Cut Paw Paw is a renovation and extension to a double fronted weatherboard home in Seddon, Victoria, Australia.

Name? Cut Paw Paw is the name of the parish in which the house presides, and a name that the owners liked very much. It’s weird, hence we like it too.

Why? Construction sites are fascinating and often very beautiful. When wandering the street and stumbling upon an anonymous house in construction we all get excited by the possibilities. We all imagine what the finished building could be like. The site holds so much promise when there is nothing more than a timber or steel frame. It is a jungle gym, a relic, and a skeleton full of play and imagination. Often it is when a building is at its most beautiful.

All too soon the excitement, the imagination and the potential comes crashing down as the reality of the finished building becomes apparent. When the anonymous house is roofed, clad and finished it is often a disappointment as the banality of the McMansion emerges. The beautiful skeleton that held such potential and required such imagination has been buried beneath the ordinary, the obvious and the banal. The home will not again be interesting until it eventually begins to crumble and decay.

Cut Paw Paw is a structure that is deliberately incomplete. Derek and Michelle, the owners, asked that the house be “ridiculously inside-out”. To accomplish this we not only employed tested and successful ideas such as sliding walls, bifold doors and decks, we also left the building incomplete. The central space, between the dining area and the studio, is an unclad frame within and surrounded by garden. It is both inside and outside. It is both a new building and an old ruin. It is both garden and home.

Sustainable? Like all of our building, sustainability is at the core of Cut Paw Paw. Rather than simply extruding the existing structure we have run the new form along the southern boundary so that it is soaked with sunlight. The openings and windows have been designed to optimise passive solar gain, thereby drastically reducing demands on mechanical heating and cooling. All windows are double glazed. White roofs drastically reduce urban heat sink and demands on air conditioning. We have a pond on the face of the largest north facing opening. While providing a home for fish and plants, the pond also serve as a mechanism to passively cool the house through natural evaporative cooling. Water tanks and solar panels have their place as they do on all of our projects. High performance insulation is everywhere, even in the walls of the original house.

PROJECT DATA Architect: Andrew Maynard Architects Directors: Mark Austin and Andrew Maynard Design Architect: Andrew Maynard Project Architect: Mark Austin Completion date: March 2014 Builder: Marcus Hamilton, Mark Projects Engineer: Maurice Farrugia and Associates”

You may also like

Maison De Gaspé by la SHED architecture

Gumno House by Turato Architects

Closse Residence by Naturhumaine

Leave a Reply

Advertising directly on MOCO LOCO is quick, simple, precisely targeted and cost-effective: learn more